Get A Symposion of Praise: Horace Returns to Lyric in Odes IV PDF

By Timothy Johnson

ISBN-10: 0299207447

ISBN-13: 9780299207441

    Ten years after publishing his first selection of lyric poetry, Odes I-III, Horace (65 B.C.-8 B.C.) lower back to lyric and released one other publication of fifteen odes, Odes IV. those later lyrics, which compliment Augustus, the imperial kin, and different political insiders, have frequently been handled extra as propaganda than paintings. yet in A Symposion of compliment, Timothy Johnson examines the richly textured ambiguities of Odes IV that interact the viewers within the communal or "sympotic" formula of Horace's compliment. Surpassing propaganda, Odes IV displays the finely nuanced and resourceful poetry of Callimachus instead of the traditions of Aristotelian and Ciceronian rhetoric, which suggest that compliment may still current normally admitted virtues and vices.  during this manner, Johnson demonstrates that Horace's software of competing views establishes him as Pindar's rival.    Johnson indicates the Horatian panegyrist is greater than a based poet representing merely the needs of his buyers. The poet forges the panegyric schedule, starting up the nature of the compliment (its mode, lyric, and content material either optimistic and negative), and calls jointly a neighborhood to affix within the construction and model of Roman identities and civic ideologies. With this insightful analyzing, A Symposion of compliment could be of curiosity to historians of the Augustan interval and its literature, and to students attracted to the dynamics among own expression and political energy.

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A Symposion of Praise: Horace Returns to Lyric in Odes IV by Timothy Johnson PDF

    Ten years after publishing his first number of lyric poetry, Odes I-III, Horace (65 B. C. -8 B. C. ) lower back to lyric and released one other ebook of fifteen odes, Odes IV. those later lyrics, which compliment Augustus, the imperial relations, and different political insiders, have frequently been handled extra as propaganda than artwork.

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Cat. 3a– 4: namque tu solebas / meas esse aliquid putare nugas). 56 Before Horace speaks a word, that poet extends a Catullanesque greeting to match Horace’s poetic trifles, ‘sweetest in the world’ (dulcissime rerum, 4). Horace responds in kind that he is doing ‘nicely’ (suaviter, 5) and adds the qualifier, ‘as things are at present’ (ut nunc est), a double entendre—for anyone who has caught that these common greetings are also specialized tags for the new poetry (dulcis, suavis)57— which lets the other poet know Horace has understood his greeting and is answering with the same literary jargon that is, or was, fashionable for a moment: suaviter, ut nunc est = I am doing nicely, which is how trendy poets talk for now.

For instance, banausia differs from munificence, not in the amount spent, but in the manner of the expenditure. There must be harmony, that is, the expense must fit the occasion. The deed can exceed but must not fall below the status of the recipient, and the motive for the expense cannot be personal recognition or profit, but the recipient’s goodness (Arist. b. 1122b4–7). Any lack of harmony results in flattery (Pl. 590a8–c). 1 parallels the Aristotelian review of banausic labor and therefore distinguishes Horace’s praise from flattery.

But passion can yet warm Leuconoë’s winters. Horace tempers the pessimism in the concluding lines when he interjects pointed commands for Leuconoë to enjoy life (vina liques; carpe diem) into two expressions about the brevity of time (sapias . . reseces; dum loquimur . . credula postero, 6b–8). The coordination of the jussives indicates how closely Horace associates carpe diem and the sympotic. 3 is darker and even more personal. Horace names the song’s addressee “Dellius bound to die” (moriture Delli, 4) and manipulates the seriocomic structure to maximize pessimistic tones.

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A Symposion of Praise: Horace Returns to Lyric in Odes IV (Wisconsin Studies in Classics) by Timothy Johnson


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